26 May

Best Linux distributions for 2017

The new year is upon us, and it’s time to look toward what the next 365 days have in store. As we are wont to do, Linux.com looks at what might well be the best Linux distributions to be found from the ever-expanding crop of possibilities.

1- Best distro for sysadmins : Parrot Linux

Parrot Security OS (or ParrotSec) is a Linux distribution based on Debian with a focus on computer security.[1] It is designed for penetration testing, vulnerability assessment and mitigation, computer forensics and anonymous web browsing. It is developed by the Frozenbox Team.

Discover the Parrot Universe and get the most from our awesome Debian-based platform.
Professional tools for security testing, software development and privacy defense, all in one place.

 

 2- Best lightweight distribution: LXLE

 LXLE is based on Lubuntu which is an Ubuntu OS using the LXDE desktop environment. It is designed to be a drop-in and go OS, primarily for aging computers. Its intention is to be able to install it on any computer and be relatively done after install. At times removing unwanted programs or features is easier than configuring for a day. Our distro follows the same LTS schedule as Ubuntu. In short, LXLE is an eclectic respin of Lubuntu with its own user support.

3- Best desktop distribution: Elementary OS

elementary OS is a Linux distribution based on Ubuntu. It is the flagship distribution to showcase the Pantheon desktop environment

4- Best distribution for those with something to prove: Gentoo

 Gentoo is a free operating system based on either Linux or FreeBSD that can be automatically optimized and customized for just about any application or need.
Extreme configurability, performance and a top-notch user and developer community are all hallmarks of the Gentoo experience.

5- Best Linux for IoT: Snappy Ubuntu Core

 Ubuntu Core is a tiny, transactional version of Ubuntu for IoT devices and large container deployments. It runs a new breed of super-secure, remotely upgradeable Linux app packages known as snaps ‐ and it’s trusted by leading IoT players, from chipset vendors to device makers and system integrators.

6- Best non-enterprise server distribution: CentOS

 CentOS Linux is a community-supported distribution derived from sources freely provided to the public by Red Hat for Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL). As such, CentOS Linux aims to be functionally compatible with RHEL. The CentOS Project mainly changes packages to remove upstream vendor branding and artwork. CentOS Linux is no-cost and free to redistribute. Each CentOS version is maintained for up to 10 years (by means of security updates — the duration of the support interval by Red Hat has varied over time with respect to Sources released). A new CentOS version is released approximately every 2 years and each CentOS version is periodically updated (roughly every 6 months) to support newer hardware. This results in a secure, low-maintenance, reliable, predictable and reproducible Linux environment.

7- Best enterprise server distribution: RHEL

 Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) is a Linux distribution developed by Red Hat and targeted toward the commercial market. Red Hat Enterprise Linux is released in server versions for x86, x86-64, Itanium, PowerPC and IBM System z, and desktop versions for x86 and x86-64. All of the Red Hat’s official support and training, together with the Red Hat Certification Program, focuses on the Red Hat Enterprise Linux platform. Red Hat Enterprise Linux is often abbreviated to RHEL, although this is not an official designation
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